Archive for October, 2012

Webinar: Materials Cycling: A Focus on Plastics

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012 by

Friday, November 16, 2012 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM (CST)
Register at http://www.eventbrite.com/event/4706755031

Sponsored by the NorthStar Initiative for Sustainable Enterprise (NiSE). Registration is free.

Less than 30% of plastics used in bottles and less than 9% of all plastic waste is recycled in the United States. While municipal recycling programs have traditionally focused on bottle recycling, other plastics – including film and rigid plastics – compose the majority of available plastic waste. As communities seek to reduce waste sent to landfills and meet higher diversion targets, there is increased interest in including these additional plastics in recycling programs. Through the presentations and discussion in this webinar, we hope to explore plastics recycling and its future potential from a variety of perspectives.

There’s still time to register for Catching the Wave – Green Chemistry and Economic Development in the Great Lakes Region

Thursday, October 25th, 2012 by

Great Lakes Green Chemistry Conference & GreenScreenTM for Safer Chemicals Training
November 13-15, 2012
Hyatt Regency, Chicago IL
Register at http://www.glrppr.org/conference/registration.cfm

November 13 – 14: Catching the Wave – Green Chemistry and Economic Development in the Great Lakes Region

  • Learn first-hand about the business case for Green Chemistry and Engineering and how companies can take advantage of technical assistance opportunities to help them move forward in their own effort to promote sustainability
  • Hear from businesses who have successfully used the framework of green chemistry who will talk about what the benefits for their businesses have been
  • Are public-private partnerships the wave of the future? Hear from the leaders who are building these partnerships today
  • Take advantage of working sessions to identify technical assistance needs and develop resources to promote Green Chemistry in the Great Lakes region. See the Agenda.

November 15: GreenScreenTM for Safer Chemicals Training (space is limited)

Register early for this in-depth experiential training on how to use the GreenScreenTM for Safer Chemicals, a comparative chemical screening method developed by Clean Production Action to help move our society toward the use of greener and safer chemicals. This workshop is intended to educate designers and decision-makers on how to implement the GreenScreenTM to compare and select safer chemicals for use in products and manufacturing processes. See the Agenda.

Documents Recently Added to Sector Resources

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012 by

These publications were recently added to GLRPPR’s Sector Resources. This list is continuously updated on the web, fed to GLRPPR’s Twitter and Facebook accounts, and is available as an RSS feed.

  • Inherently Safer Technology Gaps Analysis Study
    This project consisted of an analysis of the current state of knowledge for improving safety regarding toxic industrial chemicals, including an examination of current and state-of-the-art techniques and technologies capable of increasing safety and security This project consisted of an analysis of the current state of knowledge for improving safety regarding toxic industrial chemicals, including an examination of current and state-of-the-art techniques and technologies capable of increasing safety and security in production, transportation, storage, and use of hazardous chemicals. The primary goal was to improve national security through improved safety by providing a foundation for a comprehensive evaluation of the current state of knowledge surrounding the source and production methods of the “Release – Toxic” chemicals in DHS CFATS Appendix A list of chemicals of interest. Additionally, this project assisted in the data gathering and development of the CSAC IST Metrics. This involved an in-depth effort to understand specific chemical processes followed by a conceptual effort to redefine the Chemical Release Reduction Modifier that was included in the original Index. involved an in-depth effort to understand specific chemical processes followed by a conceptual effort to redefine the Chemical Release Reduction Modifier that was included in the original Index.
  • Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)
    Energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) allow Federal agencies to conduct energy projects with limited to no up-front capital costs, minimizing the need for Congressional appropriations. An ESPC is a working relationship between a Federal agency and an energy service company (ESCO). The ESCO conducts a comprehensive energy audit for the Federal facility and identifies improvements to save energy. In consultation with the Federal agency, the ESCO designs and constructs a project that meets the agency’s needs and arranges the necessary funding. The ESCO guarantees the improvements will generate energy cost savings sufficient to pay for the project over the term of the contract. After the contract ends,all additional cost savings accrue to the agency. Contract terms of up to 25 years are allowed.
  • Water Scarcity: A Dive into Global Reporting Trends
    In this edition of KPMG’s Sustainable Insight we explore how the world’s major businesses are setting out their approaches to water scarcity via their key communication vehicles on corporate responsibility (CR) and sustainability. We investigate what they are reporting on and — sometimes more importantly — what they are not reporting on, and we draw out significant variances between sectors and geographic regions. Water scarcity has risen to the top of the corporate agenda over the past few years. In the face of dire predictions about dwindling supplies, a growing number of businesses are taking measures to become better stewards of this vital resource. The results suggest that while most companies are at least paying lip service to the issue in their reports, far fewer are presenting a convincing picture of a thorough and robust response to the challenge. You will also understand what best practice looks like; how — and why — they should improve their company’s response to water scarcity; and how they can communicate that response more effectively to their stakeholders. We conclude with ten key questions designed to help you develop and communicate strategic responses to the water scarcity challenge.
  • CARMA – Carbon Monitoring for Action
    CARMA is a database containing information about the carbon emissions of over 60,000 power plants and 20,000 power companies worldwide.
  • Implementing Agricultural Conservation Practices: Barriers and Incentives
    This publication is one in a multi-volume set developed by the Water Quality Information Center at the National Agricultural Library in support of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP). The bibliography is a guide to recent literature examining agricultural producers’ views of conservation programs and practices. It provides people working in the area of agriculture and the environment with a guide to information resources that focus on the psychological and socioeconomic factors that influence agricultural producers’ behavior with regard to environmental issues.
  • Climate and Energy-Water-Land System Interactions: Technical Report to the U.S. Department of Energy in Support of the National Climate Assessment
    This report provides a framework to characterize and understand the important elements of climate and energy-water-land (EWL) system interactions. It identifies many of the important issues, discusses our understanding of those issues, and presents a long-term research program research needs to address the priority scientific challenges and gaps in our understanding. Much of the discussion is organized around two discrete case studies with the broad themes of (1) extreme events and (2) regional intercomparisons. These case studies help demonstrate unique ways in which energy-water-land interactions can occur and be influenced by climate.
  • On carbon footprints and growing energy use
    Could fractional reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organization lead to a corresponding real reduction in atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions in the next ten years? Curtis M. Oldenburg, head of the Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program of LBNL’s Earth Sciences Division, considers his own organization’s carbon footprint and answers this critical question? In addressing the problem of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change, it is essential that we understand which activities are producing GHGs and the scale of emission for each activity, so that reduction efforts can be efficiently targeted. The GHG emissions to the atmosphere of an individual or group are referred to as the ‘carbon footprint’. This terminology is entirely appropriate, because 85% of the global marketed energy supply comes from carbon-rich fossil fuel sources whose combustion produces CO{sub 2}, the main GHG causing global climate change. Furthermore, the direct relation between CO2 emissions and fossil fuels as they are used today makes energy consumption a useful proxy for carbon footprint. It would seem to be a simple matter to reduce energy consumption across the board, both individually and collectively, to help reduce our carbon footprints and therefore solve the energy-climate crisis. But just how much can we reduce carbon footprints when broader forces, such as growth in energy use, cause the total footprint to simultaneously expand? In this feature, I present a calculation of the carbon footprint of the Earth Sciences Division (ESD), the division in which I work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and discuss the potential for reducing this carbon footprint. It will be apparent that in terms of potential future carbon footprint reductions under projections of expected growth, ESD may be thought of as a microcosm of the situation of the world as a whole, in which alternatives to the business-as-usual use of fossil fuels are needed if absolute GHG emission reductions are to be achieved. Originally published in: Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology, 1(1).
  • Hot for Warm Water Cooling
    Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and remains on the roadmap for the foreseeable future. This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders of magnitude larger than that of air and once heat has been transferred to a liquid, it can be removed from the data center efficiently. The transition from air to liquid cooling is an inflection point providing an opportunity to work collectively to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid-cooled High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and systems. The vision is to use non-compressor-based cooling, to facilitate heat re-use, and thereby build solutions that are more energy-efficient, less carbon intensive and more cost effective than their air-cooled predecessors. The Energy Efficient HPC Working Group is developing guidelines for warmer liquid-cooling temperatures in order to standardize facility and HPC equipment, and provide more opportunity for reuse of waste heat. This report describes the development of those guidelines.
  • The Value of Energy Performance and Green Attributes in Buildings: A Review of Existing Literature and Recommendations for Future Research
    Labels, certifications, and rating systems for energy efficiency performance and “green” attributes of buildings have been available in the U.S. for over 10 years, and used extensively in the European Union and Australia for longer. Such certifications and ratings can make energy efficiency more visible, and could help spur demand for energy efficiency if these designations are shown to have a positive impact on sales or rental prices. This policy brief discusses the findings and methodologies from recent studies on this topic, and suggests recommendations for future research. Although there have been just a handful of studies within the last 10 years that have investigated these effects, a few key findings emerge: To maximize sales price impact, label or rating information must be disclosed early and visibly in the sales process; The approach to evaluating energy efficiency labels (e.g., ENERGY STAR) and general “green” certifications (e.g., LEED or GreenPoint Rated) may need to be different, depending on the type, vintage and market penetration of the label; Collaborative efforts to promote label adoption and build a large dataset of labeled buildings will be required to produce reliable study results.
  • Our Impending Energy, Climate, and Economic-Development Crisis
    Slides for talk presented at Conference: Renesan Institute for Lifelong Learning ; 2012-09-14 – 2012-11-14 ; Santa Fe, New Mexico, United States.

Approximately $7.1 Million in Funding Available for State, Local, and Tribal Governments

Friday, October 19th, 2012 by

EPA Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities – Technical Assistance

The EPA Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities Program provides quick, targeted technical assistance to selected local and/or tribal governments using a variety of tools that have demonstrated results and widespread application. Technical assistance will be delivered by EPA staff and by four nonprofit organizations with expertise in sustainable communities.

Assistance from EPA

  • Application Due: October 26, 2012
  • Eligible Entities: Local, county, or tribal governments.
  • EPA will offer nine tools, including planning bikeshare programs, creating a green streets strategy, and a green building toolkit. In 2013, EPA will select up to 44 communities for assistance.

For more information, see the technical assistance webpage.

Assistance from EPA Grantees

  • Application Due: Varies by organization. Due dates range from October 25, 2012 to February 2013.
  • Eligible Entities: Varies by organization. Eligible entities encompass local, county, or tribal governments.
  • Four nonprofit organizations, Forterra, Global Green USA, Project for Public Spaces, and Smart Growth America, have received grants from EPA to offer assistance using tools they have chosen. Global Green’s assistance is based on the LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) standard, which provides a nationally recognized method for creating neighborhoods that are walkable, bikeable, resource-efficient, and equitable. Livability Solutions will offer technical assistance to 6 to 12 communities, enabling local governments and communities to implement changes that move them toward smart growth and sustainability. This technical assistance will take the form of one- to two-day workshops. Smartgrowth America will offer technical assistance in 12 types of one- or two-day workshops such as sustainable land use code audit and local strategies to slow climate change. Forterra’s competition is expected to open in February 2013.

For more information, see the technical assistance webpage.

FEMA 2012 Community Resilience Innovation Challenge – Up to $35,000 per selected project

  • Application Due: November 16, 2012
  • Eligible Entities: Agencies, institutions, business entities, associations, organizations, or groups (public or private sector) operating within the local jurisdiction where the project will be conducted.

The 2012 Challenge program will support a broad range of activities designed to foster community resilience. Particular focus will be placed on reaching across social sectors, while a specific goal will be increased local dialogue that includes the sharing of information about local risks and the vulnerabilities of and consequences for local residents and their well-being. Activities can range from establishing a way to train neighborhoods to prepare and take care of themselves and others in an emergency situation to co-hosting initiatives with the private sector to actively involve businesses and organizations to improve preparedness programs, from involving children and youth through educational programs and activities to sponsoring drills for local hazards.

For more information, visit the Challenge webpage.

AIA Sustainable Design Assessment Teams (SDAT) – Technical Assistance

  • Application Due: November 16, 2012
  • Eligible Entities: Committees with a cross-section of residents, local government agencies, businesses, institutions, and community groups. A letter of support from the local AIA chapter is required.

The Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) program focuses on the importance of developing sustainable communities through design. The American Institute of Architects’ Center for Communities by Design is seeking potential partner communities that can demonstrate the capacity to convene a diverse set of community leaders and stakeholders for an intensive, collaborative planning process focused on long-term sustainability. The Center is particularly focused on identifying communities that have the ability to leverage local resources and build strong partnerships for implementation of an SDAT process. Awarded communities will receive pro bono services from a multidisciplinary team through the program, and the AIA commits to funding up to $15,000 for each project to cover team expenses.

For more information, visit the AIA SDAT page.

EPA Environmental Education Regional Model Grants – $2.16 million

  • Application Due: November 21, 2012
  • Eligible Entities: Any local education agency, college or university, state education or environmental agency, nonprofit organization, or a noncommercial educational broadcasting entity. Tribal education agencies that are eligible to apply include a school or community college controlled by an Indian tribe, band, or nation that is recognized as eligible for special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians and which is not administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

The purpose of the Environmental Education Regional Grant Program is to increase public awareness and knowledge about environmental issues and provide the skills that participants in its funded projects need to make informed environmental decisions and take responsible actions toward the environment. In order to be eligible, all applications must address at least one of the EPA educational priorities listed and at least one EPA environmental priority. EPA educational priorities are community projects, human health and the environment, and career development. EPA environmental priorities include protecting air quality, preventing pollution, cleaning up our communities, and protecting America’s waters. EPA expects to award one grant per Region for an expected 10 grants nationwide.

For more information, visit the grant opportunity webpage.

EPA Brownfield Area-wide Planning Grant – $4 Million

  • Application Due: November 30, 2012
  • Eligible Entities: General purpose unit of local government; Indian Tribe other than in Alaska, Alaska Native Regional Corporation, Alaska Native Village Corporation, and Metlakatla Indian Community; land clearance authority or other quasi-governmental entity; regional council or group of general purpose units of local government; government entity created by state legislature; redevelopment agency that is chartered or otherwise sanctioned by a state; a state that is serving in a fiscal and administrative capacity on behalf of a local community; nonprofit organizations, including institutions of higher education.

This grant will fund projects to facilitate community involvement and conduct research, training, and technical assistance necessary to develop area-wide plans and implementation strategies to facilitate brownfields assessment, cleanup, and subsequent reuse. Brownfields area-wide planning grant funding must be directed to specific areas affected by a single large or multiple brownfield sites, such as a neighborhood, downtown district, city block, or local commercial corridor. The grant funding will result in an area-wide plan, including implementation strategies, for the brownfields-affected area.

For more information, see the request for proposals.

USDA 2013 Urban and Community Forestry Grant – Approximately $900,000

  • Application Due: December 3, 2012
  • Eligible Entities: Any U.S. non-federal organization, operating within the United States or its territories.

The 2013 National Urban and Community Forestry Challenge Cost-Share Grant Program will support urban and community forestry projects on nonfederal public land that have a national or widespread impact and application. The National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council is seeking innovative grants proposals for program development, research, and collaboration to address the following two strategic priority issues: proposals that demonstrate the connection between the personal benefits of urban forests and quality of life within a community through community engagement; and proposals that design an urban forestry recruitment program and retention strategies that support existing urban forestry academic curricula. Urban and community forests demonstrate benefits including urban heat island reduction. All grant funds must be matched at least equally with non-federal source funds.

For more information, see the request for proposals.

Webinars Upcoming for Brownfields Grants, Environmental Justice and Sustainability, Solar Hot Water in Higher Education Facilities, and Small-Scale CHP

Thursday, October 18th, 2012 by

October 22, 2012, 2:00–3:00 pm (EDT) – EPA FY13 Brownfields Area-Wide Planning Grant Guidelines
All potential EPA Brownfields Area-Wide Planning Grant applicants are invited to this webinar, which will walk through the FY13 Brownfields Area-Wide Planning Grant Guidelines, discuss eligibility and ranking criteria, and answer any questions potential applicants may have

October 22, 2012, 11:00am–12:00 pm (EDT) – Mayor Bill Finch (Bridgeport, Connecticut) Speaks on Government Support for Environmental Justice and the BGreen 2020 Plan
Join Mayor Bill Finch of Bridgeport, Connecticut, and the HUD-DOT-EPA Partnership for Sustainable Communities for a webinar on how the city of Bridgeport is working to become “New England’s greenest city.” An EPA Environmental Justice Showcase Community, Bridgeport was featured in the Partnership’s 2012 Accomplishments Report and recent Partnership video.

Mayor Finch will discuss Bridgeport’s BGreen 2020 plan for a sustainable Bridgeport and how Bridgeport accessed support from state and federal agencies to help improve the quality of life for city residents. Officials from HUD, DOT, and EPA will discuss how the Partnership (which helps communities improve access to affordable housing, increase transportation options, and protect the environment) has been working to assist environmental justice communities.

  • Webinar link (no preregistration required; log in as “Guest” when the webinar starts.
  • Call-in for audio: (888) 850-4523. Participant passcode: 719661.Note that this conference has a maximum audio capacity of 299 callers. Please share phone lines if possible.

October 25, 2012, 1:00–2:30 pm (EDT) – Saving Energy through Solar Water Heating Technologies in Higher Education Buildings

This webinar, hosted by EPA’s Energy Supply and Industry Branch, will showcase solar thermal technology applications in higher education facilities that reduce water heating costs for cleaning, showering, and laundering. Two university professionals will discuss the economic, energy, and social motivations that led them to consider a solar water heating system, how they handled perceived and real risks or barriers to project development, as well as the financial and energy savings each institution has experienced. A technical expert will also provide an overview of the common solar thermal technologies in higher education that reduce water heating costs.

October 30, 2012, 1:00–2:00 pm (EDT) – Combined Heat and Power In the Mid-Atlantic: How Small-Scale CHP Systems Can Boost Energy Efficiency and Save Money
EPA Region 3 will host a webinar on small-scale combined heat and power (CHP) application in the Mid-Atlantic. The webinar will provide a forum for attendees to learn about small-scale CHP systems their economic, environmental, and efficiency benefits—particularly for hotel, college/university, and office buildings. Examples of current CHP applications in downtown Philadelphia will be profiled to highlight the CHP process. The webinar will include a presentation and case studies by Philadelphia Gas Works, the nation’s largest municipally owned natural gas utility, serving more than 500,000 customers.

  • Preregistration (required). Note that participation is limited to the first 50 registrants.

Webinar: Using the GreenScreen™ to Identify Preferred Materials in HP’s Global Supply Chain

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012 by

Thu, Nov 1, 2012 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT
Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3362707123641864448

This webinar will provide an introduction to the GreenScreen™ for Safer Chemicals and one user’s experience. The GreenScreen is a method for comparative chemical hazard assessment that is currently used by a growing number of large manufacturers of products ranging from chemicals to electronics, apparel and footwear. That user is Hewlett Packard (HP) who has been a leader in using comparative chemical hazard assessment, specifically the GreenScreen, to identify safer alternatives to chemicals of concern in their global material supply chain.

How California is harnessing P2 to make safer products

Monday, October 15th, 2012 by

The latest P2 Pathways column focuses on California’s product stewardship efforts, including a proposed Safer Consumer Products Regulation. Visit http://www.greenbiz.com/business/engage/enterprise-blogs/p2-pathways to see the P2 Pathways archive.

10 Webcasts for Climate and Energy Staff: measure climate change health impacts, access sustainability tech help, and more

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012 by

EPA Webcasts

October 4, 3:00-4:00 PM (EDT) – Free Technical Assistance Available through EPA’s Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities Program

EPA’s Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities Program provides short-term, targeted technical assistance to help communities implement smart growth development approaches, such as creating a green streets strategy, linking land use to water quality, or conducting a parking audit. Participants will learn about the types of assistance available from EPA and its four grantees, and how to apply. This webinar is being held in response to requests for a repeat of the webinar that was held on Sept. 21; the content will be essentially the same.

October 11, 2:00-3:30 PM (EDT) – Estimating the Health Impacts of Climate Change and Clean Energy Programs

State and local climate change and clean energy policies can improve air quality, reduce negative impacts on human health, and save lives. This webinar will cover three EPA tools that state and local governments can use to estimate and communicate the health and related economic benefits of actions that reduce air emissions:

Audience: Recommended for state and local air quality, energy, public health, sustainability, and transportation planning staff.

October 11, 1:00-2:30 PM (EDT) – Solar Energy for Water and Wastewater Utilities: Step-by-Step Project Implementation and Funding Approaches
EPA’s Office of Wastewater Management hosts this webinar on helping water utilities understand how they can use solar energy to increase their energy efficiency. The first part of this webinar will detail the process of implementing solar energy projects at water or wastewater utilities, the various types of solar technologies available, and where they can be used most appropriately. The webinar will also highlight innovative funding approaches, including those with no up-front capital requirements, that result in long-term energy cost savings and stability. Finally, this webinar will present the case study of a successful solar installation at a small wastewater utility in Grafton, Massachusetts.

ENERGY STAR Webcasts

ENERGY STAR offers free online training to help you improve the energy performance of your organization. To register for any of these trainings or to see other upcoming ENERGY STAR trainings, visit the ENERGY STAR Trainings page.

October 3, 1:00-2:00 PM (EDT) – Top Communication Strategies to Build Support for Your Energy Program

This month’s ENERGY STAR National Building Competition webinar will explore how ENERGY STAR partners are building top-down and bottom-up support for energy initiatives through effective communications. Key strategies include sharing energy goals and data; bringing together internal teams to exchange expertise and lessons learned; communicating through reports, creative materials, and events; and engaging occupants to take an active role and interest in saving energy through competitions and other initiatives.

October 16, 12:00-1:00 PM (EDT) – Beyond the Basics of Benchmarking: Advanced Features of Portfolio Manager

So you’ve benchmarked your building, now what? This session builds on the Basics of Benchmarking, highlighting more features you can use in EPA’s Portfolio Manager to help you understand your building’s energy performance, set goals, and share and report data.

In this session you will learn about:

  • Strategies for keeping your data up-to-date and accurate;
  • Metrics to use to assess your building’s energy performance; and
  • How to use Portfolio Manager to demonstrate energy efficiency improvements with the goal setting, reporting, and sharing features.

Additionally, there will be time during the session to get your specific questions answered.

October 18, 1:00-2:00 PM (EDT) – How to Apply for ENERGY STAR Certification

You’ve benchmarked your building in EPA’s Portfolio Manager, you’ve worked hard to improve its energy efficiency to get the building’s score up to a 75, and now you want to get EPA recognition for this accomplishment. The ENERGY STAR Certification will distinguish your building as a superior energy performer.

October 24, 2:00-3:00 PM (EDT) – How to Launch an ENERGY STAR Energy Efficiency Competition

Time and time again, leading ENERGY STAR partners have found that a spirit of healthy competition and the opportunity for recognition are among the best drivers for participation in organization- or community-wide energy management. Any organization can run a competition, including trade associations, commercial businesses, manufacturing companies, local and state governments, schools, congregations, and more. Join ENERGY STAR for this hour-long presentation to learn about (1) the many benefits of energy efficiency competitions; (2) the basic steps you can take to plan and launch an energy efficiency competition; (3) common barriers and possible solutions; and (4) the resources made available by ENERGY STAR that can help you in this process, including the ENERGY STAR Guide to Energy Efficiency Competitions.

October 30, 2:00-3:15 PM (EDT) – Financing Energy Efficient Upgrades with ENERGY STAR

Learn how public sector organizations are improving energy efficiency with innovative solutions to financial barriers. Attendees will learn about financing projects in the public and private sectors, the basics of performance contracting, and how EPA’s tools and resources can help you make the decision to improve your facilities now or later.

NALGEP (National Association of Local Government Environmental Professionals)

October 3, 2:00-3:15 PM (EDT) – EPA’s Brownfields Area-wide Pilot Program: Lessons Learned and New Funding Opportunity

EPA’s Brownfields Area-wide Pilot Program is helping 23 pilot communities respond to local brownfields challenges, particularly where multiple brownfield sites are in close proximity; connected by infrastructure; and limit the overall economic, environmental, and social prosperity of their surroundings. The webinar, sponsored by NALGEP and the Brownfield Communities Network, will discuss lessons learned from the program, share pilot examples, and preview plans for the upcoming RFP for the next round of pilot grants.

ACEEE (American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy)

October 11, 4:00-5:00 PM (EDT) – Community-Based Social Marketing (CBSM) and Home Energy Retrofit Programs

The ACEEE webinar will be co-hosted by staff from the One Change Foundation, who will be on hand to discuss details of their High Five philosophy for mounting CBSM campaigns in support of home energy retrofits. High Five is one of the approaches discussed in the recent ACEEE white paper,Reaching the “High-Hanging Fruit” through Behavior Change: How Community-Based Social Marketing Puts Energy Savings within Reach. This white paper, the first in a forthcoming series on social and behavioral insights and their application for energy efficiency programs, will be available for download on Wednesday, October 10, 2012.

From the State and Local Archives

Climate Change Adaptation for State and Local Governments

This three-part series is one of the most popular series we’ve ever hosted. You can listen to all of it online, in addition to the dozens of other webcasts we have archived on our website.

  • Part One: Climate Impacts and Risk Communication
  • Part Two: Adaptation Planning and Implementation
  • Part Three: Federal Resources and Support for Climate Change Adaptation