Archive for December, 2012

P2Rx™ Announces Behavioral Change Webinar Series for Technical Assistance Providers

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012 by

The Pollution Prevention Resource Exchange (P2Rx™) will launch a comprehensive webinar training series in January 2013 to help pollution prevention technical assistance providers initiate, implement, and measure behavioral change resulting from their programs and initiatives.

There is a strong focus nationwide on being able to measure behavior change resulting from federal and state pollution prevention and sustainability initiatives.  There is also a lot of interest in how to use social media and social marketing to drive meaningful change in organizations.  To address these questions and help technical assistance providers expand their reach and better understand their effectiveness, the P2Rx centers have collaborated to develop a webinar training series featuring experts and specialists from around the country.  Five monthly webinar trainings are scheduled for January-May 2013.  A listing of these FREE webinars can be found at: www.P2Rx.org.

About P2Rx:

P2Rx is a national partnership of regional pollution prevention information centers funded in part through grants from EPA.  They build networks, deliver P2 information, and measure P2 program results.  The strength of the network lies in the expertise and diversity among the regional centers and the variety of audiences served including government and state environmental agencies, technical assistance providers, businesses, educators, nonprofit organizations, and the general public.  For more information, visit: www.p2rx.org.

Title: Beyond Energy Efficiency: Behavior Change Tactics for the Pollution Prevention Community
Date/Time:
Thursday, January 17, 2013 / 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM CST
Webinar link: https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/833280647

Join Susan Mazur-Stommen, Director of Behavior and Human Dimensions Program at the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), to discuss what behavior change research tells us about how people make decisions and what motivates them to make changes. She will also examine how pollution prevention technical assistance providers can use that research to influence behavior change and improve implementation rates at the companies they work with.

Title: Using Social Media Channels to Inspire Offline Action
Date/Time:
Wednesday,February 20, 2013 /11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PST
Webinar link: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/259888354

Zoey Kroll is an Internet Communications Coordinator at SF Environment and a Social Media Strategist at Hayes Valley Farm. She will talk about using social media channels to inspire offline action. In the webinar, we’ll interact with and discuss how apps (RecycleWhere), activity clubs (Photo Adventure Club), and social media tools can inspire people to move from clicks to compost.

Title: Embedding Sustainability In An Organizational Structure
Date/Time:
Thursday, March 7, 2013 / 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM CST
Webinar link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6242325881081454848

An Assistant Professor in Technology and Operations Management at SFU Surrey, Stephanie Bertels’ research interests include innovations related to sustainability, institutional change, inter-organizational collaboration, and resilience and reliability. Her current research bridges organization theory and the issues surrounding sustainable development to explore how organizations can develop and implement innovative strategies for a more sustainable future.

Title: Make People Do Good Things (Sometimes Via Social Media)
Date/Time:
Thursday, April 11, 2013 / 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PDT
Webinar link: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/886701426

At San Francisco Dept. of Environment, Jessian Choy led the creation of SFApproved.org to make it easier for you to buy over 1,000 green products. And she uses fun scavenger hunts to engage 28,000 City staff with draconian laws to buy green. Jessian leads negotiation and role-play trainings to prevent good ideas from dying with bad storytelling and hecklers.

In this interactive event, get answers to these questions and more:

  • What are new, easy tips to make it fun for people to do good things?
  • How can you engage people if they unfollow or unlike you?
  • What should you do so your audience tweets about your event during and after?
  • How will it be easier for you to find less-toxic, green products with the improved SF Approved List coming in March 2013

Title: Environmental Sustainability and Behavioral Science: Meta-Analysis of Pro-environmental Behavior Experiments
Date/Time:
TBD
Webinar link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6597474733924842752

Richard Osbaldiston has been working as a research psychologist for over 15 years. He has found there is one fundamental cause-effect relationship: the motivation that comes from within a person is what causes that person to behave in certain ways. When the right situations and settings are created, people can achieve unbelievable things. Richard’s goal is taking his work in the field of motivation and applying it to the long-term care industry to ultimately change people’s lives for the better. Richard received his PhD in Psychology with a minor in statistics and research methods from the University of Missouri.

Archive of Pollution Prevention Information: What’s Out There and Where to Find It

Friday, December 14th, 2012 by

The webinar is archived at https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/877931279.

If you participated yesterday or viewed the webinar online, please also take a moment to complete the post-webinar evaluation at https://illinois.edu/sb/sec/692437. Your feedback helps GLRPPR make these webinars more useful for you.

The presentation slides are available at http://hdl.handle.net/2142/35294. There is also an associated resource guide, which you can access at http://uiuc.libguides.com/p2. If you have suggestions for additions to the resource guide, please send them to me at l-barnes at illinois.edu. I’m always interested in learning about new P2 information sources.

Pollution Prevention Technical Assistance LibGuide

Thursday, December 13th, 2012 by

This guide is designed to help pollution prevention technical assistance providers find information quickly and efficiently. It includes a brief guide to effective web searching, located on the Where To Start page under the Sector/Subject Specific tab. Lists of information organization and current awareness tools are included under the News & Current Awareness tab.

7 steps to effective energy management

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 by

For the month of December, Cam Metcalf, Executive Director, Kentucky Pollution Prevention Center, wrote an article for GreenBiz’s P2 Pathways Column on the seven step process for implementing an energy management system in organizations to systematically get to P2 and E2 outcomes.

Here is the link to the P2 Pathways landing page: http://www.greenbiz.com/business/engage/enterprise-blogs/p2-pathways.

2012 International E-Waste Design competition Winners Announced

Thursday, December 6th, 2012 by

Winners have been announced in the International E-Waste Competition. The competition is part of the Sustainable Electronics Initiative (SEI) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

College students and recent graduates from around the world were encouraged to submit their ideas for products and services. The entries were ideas that prevent e-waste generation through life-cycle considerations (E-Waste Prevention Category) or that incorporate e-waste components into a new and useful item (E-Waste Reuse Category). The competition is designed to prompt dialogue about product designs for environmentally responsible computing and entertainment.

The winners were announced during a ceremony on December 4, 2012 at the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC), the coordinating agency for Sustainable Electronics Initiative. ISTC is part of the Prairie Research Institute at the University of Illinois. The ceremony was simultaneously broadcast as a webinar to allow participation of as many students who entered and other interested parties as possible. That webinar will be archived on the ISTC web site at http://www.istc.illinois.edu/about/sustainability_seminars.cfm.

A total of 19 entries were submitted; 10 in the Reuse category and 9 in the Prevention category. Jurors awarded monetary prizes to the top three projects within each category, along with one honorable mention award. The first place winners will receive $3000, second place is $2000, and third place receives $1000. A total of $12,000 was awarded, which has been made possible through generous contributions by Peter Mcdonnell (Friend level) and Dell (Platinum level).

Reuse Category Winners

Platinum ($3000): digitizer. The digitizer is a revolutionary new product meant to revitalize film-based photography and bring it up to date in the digital era. It repurposes working film cameras by using a purpose built physical interface device coupled with proprietary software so that film based photographers can use their camera to capture digital images. The device includes an image sensor and image sensor card that will fit into the space normally occupied by the film and film canister within an analog camera. The hardware and software are upgradable and designed to adapt to most computer and camera formats. The purpose of the digitizer is to reduce future electronic waste of cameras while reusing materials that are electronic byproducts. It does this by reducing the number of film-based cameras that are replaced by digital cameras, upgrading and adapting to new technologies without discarding and replacing currently working devices, and reusing often discarded electronic waste in its manufacture. By manufacturing the digitizer from e-waste components, chemicals such as lead, beryllium, arsenic, and mercury will also be kept out of landfills. The digitizer serves a twofold purpose by meeting the needs of an unfulfilled market of photographers and reducing electronic waste caused by outdated cameras. This concept was submitted by a pair of industrial design students from the University of Wisconsin-Stout: J. Makai Catudio and Ryan Barnes.

Gold ($2000): The Wake-Up Project. The Wake Up Project is a highly marketable, easy to use, smart clock concept that tracks the users wake-up times using software on a reused internet router. The smart clock would also incorporate reused cell phone parts, as well as plastic recycled from e-waste. Using crossover cables connected to a built-in web interface, the user can set a time for the clock to sound every morning. There is an
option to set up an entire schedule with variable settings for each day of the week. The device can be used with Outlook or iCal and the clock program is downloaded from the Wake Up website. The clock has a simple design face with one button that can function as a snooze or to turn the clock off. The Wake Up Project is a realistic solution to the e-waste problem that can secondarily provide consumer education opportunities. The
Wake Up web site would have information about e-waste and how the consumer could play a role in solving the e-waste problem. The Wake Up Project team consists of three industrial design students from the University of Wisconsin-Stout: Danny Kopren, Sam Wellskopf, and Lennon TeRonde.

Silver ($1000): Fluorescence Microscopy Using A Recycled Paper Scanner. This idea proposes the conversion of a commercial flatbed scanner into a fluorescence microscopy instrument, which is widely used to characterize biological events in diagnostic and research laboratories. The optical design allows for the scanner sensor array to be exploited as an imaging sensor without making major modifications to the recycled device. The proposed modifications have been engineered to be inexpensive and simple, yet they bring a high payoff in terms of performance of the scanner as an imaging instrument. Fluorescence microscopy is a cost efficient way to study behaviors of specific cell populations, which can then determine the presence of diseases and the source of the cause of disease. Scanner modified fluorescence microscopy is an even more cost efficient, proliferating means for the study of cell population. This device is meant to eliminate wastes and save lives. This concept was submitted by a recent graduate in electrical engineering (Dustin Gallegos), and two current students, one in biomedical engineering (Lillian Hislop) and the other in general studies (ZhanHao Xi), at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Prevention Category Winners

Platinum ($3000): EverCloud. EverCloud is both a service and product. It is a framework which allows users to personalize their phone with features and styles specific to their taste. By investing the user in the design process, they become emotionally invested in the resulting product. An EverCloud phone is also unique in that it is actually a portal to a data server–information is not stored on the local device. EverCloud is,in essence, a “cloud” phone. All applications and information associated with the phone are stored server side. This keeps the processing requirements of the level of responsibility and care. Since the software resides server side, it is always kept up to date. If problems arise with the device, such as a broken component, it can be replaced with an identical part or even with a new style of part if the user wants to ook or the experience of interacting with the device. As a design solution, the EverCloud system would eliminate waste created by hyper replacement of cellular devices, increase user satisfaction, and begin to shift the paradigm of cellular connectivity towards a sustainable future. This team was comprised of five industrial design students from Auburn University: Sean Kennedy, Christi Talbert, Dylan Piper-Kaiser, Sarah Caudle, and Daniel Piquero.

Gold ($2000): E3: Energy Efficient Electricity. E3 is a home monitoring and manually controllable energy system. Owners of this device have the ability to lower their energy bill while simultaneously prolonging the life of their appliances and electronics. The lifespans of electronic devices are often shortened through overcharging and associated overheating. This is frequently the case with cell phones, for example. E3 would allow power to be turned off to a charger, eliminating overcharging and phantom energy use. Phantom energy is energy used by devices that are plugged in and drawing power even when the consumer is not using them. The E3 can be implemented in new buildings and retrofitted to older buildings. By installing a home meter and specialized outlets (made of recycled plastic and electronic components), the E3 can monitor home devices’ energy usage. By using a smart phone app, the owner may choose devices to disconnect when not in use to avoid phantom energy use, thus reducing CO2 emissions. The app can also determine the best times to use an appliance or device to avoid peak hours. Continued use of the E3 can reduce energy consumption and costs to consumers. The concept was developed by three industrial design students from California State University at Long Beach: John Lee, Soyoung Bae, and Sam Sauceda.

Silver ($1000): loopbook — the future of computing. The loopbook is designed to address the most  important issues in the production and use phase of electronic devices. It is a laptop specifically designed to combat electronic waste by increasing the lifecycle of the device. Where possible all parts contained in the loopbook are constructed from reused and recycled components which will also be reconstituted for future loopbooks. The use of glass, aluminum, and other modular components enable the loopbook to focus efforts on reuse and closing the electronic waste loop. The unique core computing module (CCM), which contains the processor, memory, and storage, is upgradeable and removable. Thus, data and preferences can be carried on to the next step of the computer lifecycle should the body of the loopbook need to be repaired or replaced. The loopbook can perform as both a notebook and tablet, allowing consumers to experience both methods of computing with one device. The loopbook aims to change user behavior by creating a unique and attractive proposition of ownership and support for a new computing future. Loopbook was submitted by a recent graduate in product design and technology from the University of Limerick in Ireland, Damian Coughlan.

Honorable Mention

Sounds Amass. SOUNDS AMASS is an audio amplifying device system designed for public sharing on a rental/lease program. It is specifically engineered to reuse second-hand components from the e-waste stream that can be easily replaced and removed. This makes it is easy to find alternative components and allows for lower overall maintenance costs. There are two versions of the device, Amass-Uno and Amass- Duo. Amass-Uno is blue and features smart phone docking and LED lighting. Amass-Duo is orange and equipped with a detachable megaphone, wireless microphone, and a loudspeaker system. Both models could serve as sound systems for small parties, street performances, small forums, protests, and social gatherings. The devices can be rented or leased from convenient stores and community halls. The consumer can check device availability via smart phone applications and the Internet. These devices are the easy and ecological answer to the social forum future. This concept was proposed by a recent graduate in industrial and product design from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Tai Ka Cheong.

About the Competition

The competition was started at UIUC in the fall of 2009. In 2010, the competition was expanded so students from all over the globe were able to submit their projects and an online video. Each project was judged on the project description and video. The international scope was evident through students who submitted entries from Bangladesh, Canada, Chile, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Turkey, and the United States. The jury was comprised of a variety of experts, including:

  • Jason Linnell, Executive Director, National Center of Electronics Recycling (NCER)
  • Bill Olson, Director, Office of Sustainability and Stewardship, Mobile Devices Business, Motorola, Inc.
  • Steven Samuels, Former Brand & Design Manager for ReCellular, Inc.
  • Kerstin Nelsen Strom, Ecodesign Section Chair, Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA)
  • Jennifer Wyatt, Environmental Scientist, Materials Management Branch, U.S. EPA Region 5

The videos of the winning entries will be shown on the websites of the e-waste competition at www.ewaste.illinois.edu, www.istc.illinois.edu, and www.sustainelectronics.illinois.edu, and on SEI’s YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/SEIatISTC?feature=watch.

Documents Recently Added to Sector Resources

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012 by

These publications were recently added to GLRPPR’s Sector Resources. This list is continuously updated on the web, fed to GLRPPR’s Twitter and Facebook accounts, and is available as an RSS feed.

  • Building America Energy Renovations: A Business Case for Home Performance Contracting
    This research report gives an overview of the needs and opportunities that exist in the U.S. home performance contracting industry. The report discusses industry trends, market drivers, different business models, and points of entry for existing and new businesses hoping to enter the home performance contracting industry. Case studies of eight companies who successfully entered the industry are provided, including business metrics, start-up costs, and marketing approaches.
  • Virtual Energy Forum
    A free conference that brings together stakeholders in the energy industry with potential customers, policy makers, and investors. The event, which meets twice a year and features live video presentations, real-time Q & A and a virtual exhibit floor, answers the need many senior executives have today–to better understand how to implement renewable and cost-saving energy-efficient practices in business.
  • Sustainable Materials Management – Making Better Use of Resources
    Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) is increasingly recognised as a policy approach that can make a key contribution to green growth and the challenges that are posed by sustained global economic and demographic growth. One of the key challenges of the SMM approach is to effectively address the environmental impacts that can occur along the life-cycle of materials, which frequently extends across borders and involves a multitude of different economic actors. This book outlines a series of policy principles for SMM, examines how to set and use targets for SMM, and explores various policy instruments for SMM. In addition it provides examples of policy action plans from the UK and the Netherlands, before presenting a series of conclusions and recommendations.
  • The Guide to Safer Chemicals
    A hands-on-guide that charts pathways to safer chemicals in products and supply chains for brand name companies, product manufacturers, architects and designers, retailers, and health care organizations. The Guide: marks pathways to safer chemicals in products and supply chains; sets relative benchmarks for each of the four BizNGO Principles for Safer Chemicals; specifies actions for each benchmark; presents examples of business practices for each benchmark; and illustrates how downstream users are getting started and advancing on their paths to safer chemicals. Users of The Guide will learn how to: measure internal performance, identify areas of improvement, and track progress to safer chemicals; benchmark performance in comparison to other organizations; and communicate to the public their organization’s performance in moving to safer chemicals based on an independent metric.
  • Principles for Safer Chemicals
    Demand for products made from greener chemicals is growing rapidly. Consumers, investors and governments want chemicals that have low to no toxicity and degrade into innocuous substances in the environment. Leading businesses are seeking to capture these emerging market opportunities by redesigning their products and catalyzing change in their supply chains. To advance an economy where the production and use of chemicals are healthy for humans, as well as for our global environment and its non-human inhabitants, responsible companies and their supply chains should adopt and implement these four guiding principles for chemicals policy.
  • Forward Progress in Reducing Oily-Wastewater: A Forward Osmosis, Small-scale Pilot at a Metal Fabricator
    Forward osmosis is the natural diffusion of water through a semi-permeable membrane from a solution of a lower solute concentration to a solution with a higher solute concentration. Taking advantage of this natural process, Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC) research staff successfully reduced volumes of three (3) common water-based industrial process waste streams at a small metal fabricator. Instead of conventional energy-intensive alternatives, researchers employed fledgling forward osmosis technology, using chemistry instead of energy to remove water from common process fluids.
  • Northwest Product Stewardship Council
    The Northwest Product Stewardship Council (NWPSC) is a coalition of government organizations in Washington and Oregon that operates as an unincorporated association of members. The content of this website includes product stewardship activities in the states of Oregon and Washington. They also track the product stewardship activities in California and British Columbia, Canada.
  • US State-level Chemicals Policy Database
    Includes state level legislation related to chemicals and chemical management. Search by state, region, status (e.g., enacted, proposed, and failed), policy category (e.g., pollution prevention, single chemical restriction, etc.), chemical, and product type (e.g., children’s products, cleaning products, etc.).
  • AASHE Academic Commons
    AASHE’s Academic Commons aggregates educating for sustainability materials from across the sustainability community.
  • Biochar as a Climate Change Mitigation Strategy: Does It Measure Up?
    This report evaluates the potential of biochar as a climate change solution and reviews the scientific literature to assess current data on biochar’s long-term stability in the environment.