Archive for the 'Publications' Category

Measuring the economic and environmental impact of the manufacturing sector in the Great Lakes

Wednesday, July 13th, 2016 by

The manufacturing sector is an important economic engine within the Great Lakes states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. While complying with applicable laws and regulations, these facilities also have an environmental impact on the region. In a new study, the Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable (GLRPPR) used publicly available environmental data to establish a regional baseline for industrial chemical use and emissions; pollution prevention (P2) techniques; greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; and economic impact data for selected industry sectors in U.S. EPA Region 5.

The report, The Economic and Environmental Impact of Great Lakes Manufacturing: Snapshot of Emissions, Pollution Prevention Practices, and Economic Impact Using Public Data, includes analyses of data from U.S. EPA’s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), the Greenhouse Gas Emissions database on Envirofacts, and the Census Bureau’s County Business Patterns database on American FactFinder.

 

Spotlight on U.S. EPA Region 5’s Food Manufacturing and Processing Industry

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016 by

In 2015, GLRPPR began a project to analyze public data sets to determine the impact of manufacturing on the economy and environment of the six states in U.S. EPA Region 5. The goal of this project was to use the analyzed results to assist pollution prevention technical assistance programs (P2 TAPs) with targeting their assistance efforts.

This paper summarizes preliminary findings related to the food manufacturing and processing industry (NAICS code 311).

NPPR hosts Green Chemistry Guide – Listen and Learn Webinar Series

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015 by

The City of Los Angeles, the National Pollution Prevention Roundtable (NPPR) and the Western Sustainability and Pollution Prevention Roundtable (WSPPN) announce the availability of the Green Chemistry Guide, developed in collaboration with renowned university professors, industry professionals, and the City of Los Angeles’ engineers.

This manual provides state agencies and technical assistance providers (engineers) with tools and resources to better serve their clients who are looking for information and to support greening their operations, processes, products and supply chains. Business owners can also use the publication to develop and implement green chemistry solutions and improve profitability.

WSPPN and NPPR are cohosting a series of webinars that will cover the content of the manual chapter-by-chapter.  Learn about the green chemistry movement from the authors themselves.

Ch. 5 – The Green Chemistry Mindset and Life Cycle Thinking
Tuesday, September 15 – 1:00 p.m. CDT —  Register

Chapter 5, presented by author Ally LaTourelle, covers what is the green chemistry mindset from different vantage points, the beneficial outcomes for companies that embrace green chemistry principles, and green chemistry and life cycle assessment.

Ch. 4 – Green Engineering and Pollution Prevention & Ch. 6 – Green Chemistry Tools – What’s Out There?
Wednesday, October 21 – 1:00 p.m. CDT —  Register

Jonathan Rivin covers Chapter 4 – Green Engineering and Pollution Prevention and Chapter 6 – Green Chemistry Tools – What’s Out There?

Chapter 4 covers green engineering, the principles of green chemistry, how the green engineering principles relate to P2 concepts and provides case studies of green engineering.

Chapter 6 provides an overview of software tools and guidance documents that can be used for implementing green chemistry principles, what tool to use at different stages in the product life cycle and resources for tool selection.

Ch. 7 – Building the Business Case for Green Chemistry
Monday, November 16 – 1:00 p.m. CDT — Register

Al Innes, Michelle Butler and Kate Winnebeck present Chapter 7 – how to build the business case for green chemistry, the steps needed for initiating a successful program, and accounting for all cost.

Ch. 8 – Implementation of the Green Chemistry Change and Sustaining Success
Tuesday, December 15 – 2:00 p.m. EDT —  Register

Chapter 8, presented by author Lissa McCracken, is the implementation of sustainability practices into business models and integrating pollution prevention and green chemistry strategies and models.

Pollution prevention and environmental health in nail salons

Monday, May 11th, 2015 by

Last week, the New York Times ran a series on working conditions in New York City nail salons. In response, Governor Cuomo announced emergency measures to combat wage theft and health hazards faced by nail salon employees. The articles in the NYT series are:

Over the past decade, several other states have grappled with this issue. Some of the resources that resulted from these projects include:

In addition, there are quite a few research articles on environmental health risks associated with nail salons and how to prevent them. Here are several of the more recent ones:

If you’re looking for additional information on sustainability in nail and hair salons, ask the GLRPPR Help Desk Librarian.

Report Demonstrates Over $5.4 Billion in Economic Benefits from Pollution Prevention

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015 by

P2ResultsforCongress_April 2015The Clear Choice for Environmental Sustainability: Pollution Prevention Results from 2010 to 2012 presents available information on the achievements of state and local P2 programs for the calendar years 2010 to 2012. The Report was produced by the National Pollution Prevention Roundtable (NPPR) based upon the results shared by 90 pollution prevention (P2) programs in the United States.

The Report shows that P2 projects yielded about $5.4 billion in economic benefits during the three year period. During this three-year period, waste was reduced by 8.9 billion pounds, which is the amount of waste produced by 5.5 million people annually. 8.8 billion gallons of water and 1.4 billion kWh of electricity were also conserved.  This study affirms that pollution prevention results in conservation of valuable resources and significant waste reductions.

Other achievements between 2010 and 2012 include 1.7 billion pounds of greenhouse gases (GHG) no longer being released into the earth’s atmosphere. There were also 30,000 attendees at P2-themed training events, more than 10,000 site visits conducted, and more than 240 environmental management systems development.

The Report is a product of the P2 Results Task Force, whose membership includes representatives from State P2 programs, EPA Headquarters and Regions, Pollution Prevention Resource Exchange Centers (P2Rx), as well as NPPR. The Task Force has developed a National Pollution Prevention Results Data System, (the System). The System aggregates data that is collected, managed, and synthesized by state and local P2 programs, non-profits, companies, and other organizations. It is a collaborative and ambitious effort to grow and maintain a national database of P2 results, with reduction efforts including behavior changes by industry; reductions in waste, energy consumption, and water usage; and economic gains achieved through these activities. P2 results data collection, reporting and analysis help P2 programs to ensure that they understand their impacts and can chart an effective course for the future.

Proven Results from Pollution Prevention

General Motors’ Toledo transmission manufacturing facility has committed to making pollution prevention and recycling a facility-wide priority. The plant’s effective energy conservation program was implemented as part of its “drive to zero” program. The program was recognized by the U.S. EPA for lowering greenhouse gas emissions by more than 30 percent and subsequently avoiding nearly 40,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions. GM Toledo hosts the largest rooftop solar array in the state of Ohio and uses landfill gas, which combined provide 19% of the facility’s energy use from renewable energy sources.  GM Toledo is also a landfill free facility, sending no waste from daily operations to landfill – all waste is reused, recycled or converted to energy. “Our reductions in carbon emissions from improved energy efficiency and renewable energy initiatives at the Toledo facility are made possible through the ongoing collaborative work with local utilities, state and local environmental service organizations and other private businesses,” said Laura Bartling, GM’s Midwest environmental group manager. “They’ve demonstrated what can be achieved through a holistic and community-engaging approach at reducing our environmental footprint.”

Jeffrey Burke, Executive Director for NPPR said, “We have been measuring environmental outcomes since 1990 when the Pollution Prevention Act was signed by Congress.  The collective reduction of pollutants reduced into the air, water and land in the last 25 years is just astounding.  We believe that focusing on preventing pollution at its source rather than clean-up was the right choice from the start.”

To view the Report, go to http://www.p2.org/news/ .

About

The National Pollution Prevention Roundtable, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, is the largest membership organization in the United States devoted solely to pollution prevention (P2). The mission of the Roundtable is to provide a national forum for promoting the development, implementation, and evaluation of efforts to avoid, eliminate, or reduce pollution at the source.

P2Rx is a national partnership of regional pollution prevention information centers funded in part through grants from EPA.  They build networks, deliver P2 information, and measure P2 program results.  The strength of the network lies in the expertise and diversity among the regional centers and the variety of audiences served including government and state environmental agencies, technical assistance providers, businesses, educators, nonprofit organizations, and the general public.  For more information, visit: www.p2rx.org.

New GLRPPR White Paper: Assessing the Information Needs of Pollution Prevention Technical Assistance Providers in the Great Lakes Region

Thursday, April 9th, 2015 by

As part of its 2013-2014 Pollution Prevention Information Network (PPIN) grant, GLRPPR contracted with the University of Illinois’ Survey Research Laboratory (SRL) to conduct a regional information needs assessment. The assessment was designed to determine how pollution prevention (P2) technical assistance providers in the region currently locate and access information; how they stay up-to-date in the field; how they prefer to receive training; and what training and information gaps exist within these broad focus areas. This white paper summarizes the needs assessment results. The full needs assessment report is available at http://hdl.handle.net/2142/73269.

Simplifying Environmentally Preferable Purchasing

Monday, March 2nd, 2015 by

The Northeast Recycling Council (NERC) has completed its Simplifying Environmentally Preferable Purchasing project, which was funded by the Roy A. Hunt Foundation. As part of the project, NERC developed Model Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) Specifications and Purchasing Guidelines for paper, toner cartridges, and office supplies. NERC also created fact sheets on each of the EPP Model documents, and a press release about the newly developed resources. In addition, NERC presented a webinar on the importance of EPP and the EPP model documents.

Model EPP Specifications and Purchasing Guidelines

Fact Sheets on Model EPP Specifications and Purchasing Guidelines

Simplifying EPP Webinar, July 24, 2014

Press Releases

List of Other EPP Specs

New Web Resource for Safer Chemical Substitution & Alternatives Assessments

Thursday, February 5th, 2015 by

The University of Wisconsin Solid and Hazardous Waste Education Center (SHWEC), US EPA and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) have collaborated to develop the OECD Substitution & Alternatives Assessment Toolbox.

The toolbox is a publicly available website that contains resources relevant to safer chemical substitution and alternatives assessments. Alternative assessments are processes for identifying, comparing and selecting safer alternatives to replace hazardous chemicals with the objective of promoting sustainable production and consumption.

The Toolbox has four modules:

See also Current Landscape of Alternatives Assessment Practice: A Meta-Review, a 2013 OECD report that summarizes the literature on substitution of chemicals of concern (or alternatives assessment, which is the term in use in Northern America), with a focus on the current landscape of substitution practice in OECD member countries. It discusses definitions, principles, frameworks and tools for alternatives assessment, as well as the key drivers and audiences, and it identifies the contribution that OECD can make in this space.

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency publishes BPA/BPS thermal paper reduction case studies

Thursday, December 11th, 2014 by

MPCA’s Green Chemistry and Design staff are encouraging Minnesota businesses to voluntarily reduce the amount of thermal receipt papers they use and distribute to their customers. These papers typically contain relatively high concentrations of the chemical bisphenol-A or related chemicals.

The idea is catching on, and many businesses have made the change on their own. Check out these case studies:

Washington State Department of Ecology resources on chemicals in consumer products

Friday, September 5th, 2014 by

This post originally appeared on Environmental News Bits.

The Washington State Department of Ecology’s Reducing Toxic Threats Initiative is based on the principle that preventing exposures to toxics is the smartest, cheapest and healthiest way to protect people and the environment. It supports Washington State’s Children’s Safe Product Act, which requires manufacturers of children’s products sold in Washington to report if their product contains a Chemical of High Concern to Children.

As a result of this campaign, the Department has developed several useful resources on chemicals in consumer products. They include: